How To Deal With No Call, No Show Employees

     
Sling

A no call, no show absence is a serious offense. When an employee fails to show up for work and doesn’t bother letting anyone know, it can seriously affect the other employees and even the business as a whole. If employees are left scrambling to cover the no call, no show employee, that can affect the performance of the entire shift and lead to a poor customer experience.

So how do you deal with a no call, no show employee—especially one who does it again and again? We’re here to help you answer that question. We’ll show you how you can set up a process to deal with the offender and how you can make it simpler to find a substitute for the no call, no show employee.

1. Create A No Call, No Show Policy

Every business should have policies in place to deal with absences. Without such policies, employees can start to take advantage of the system. This can result in significant scheduling problems for your business.

One of the best ways to deal with no call, no show problems like this is to create a specific policy in your employee handbook. Your no call, no show policy should include the proper way for handling emergencies and time-off requests. It should then define what constitutes a no call, no show offense so your employees know exactly what it is. Finally, this policy should list the possible consequences of not telling anyone that you’re not coming in to work.

We also recommend that you get a lawyer who is well-versed in your state’s employment laws to review your policy. That way you can be sure that all your bases are covered legally in case you have to deal with this type of issue.

2. Make Sure Everyone Understands The Policy

After you’ve established your no call, no show policy, make sure everyone—current employees and new hires alike—understands what’s required of them and has signed a document that confirms their agreement. This is an important step in dealing with no call, no show problems and should not be overlooked. It’s not enough to simply write the policy in your employee handbook or send out an email. You need to have your employees confirm that they’ve read the rules and don’t have any questions.

Skipping this step can come back to haunt you if you ever have to deal with a problem employee. Without having a written record that the employee accepts your policy and fully understands what’s expected, they can always come back and say something like, “I didn’t realize that’s what you meant…”

You can avoid these misunderstandings by highlighting your no call, no show policy during your on-boarding program for new employees. Be sure to ask trainees if they have any questions and then address any issues that may come up. Finally, have them sign a document stating that they were given the opportunity to ask questions and that they fully understand this specific policy. If you’re instituting this policy after operating without it, be sure to have a meeting for your existing employees. Give them the opportunity to ask questions and then require that they sign off on the policy.

3. Enforce Your Policy Consistently

Consistency is critical when enforcing your no call, no show policy. Some businesses have a zero-tolerance policy for these issues. Some have a set of penalties that culminate with termination. Whatever you choose as consequences, it’s important that you apply those consequences to everyone—even if the offender is an otherwise stellar employee.

We recommend giving employees at least two chances. No two emergencies are the same and there may have been certain situations that made it impossible for the employee to get to work or even call. Regardless of the explanation, after the first offense, sit down with the employee and discuss how their actions affected the morale and cohesion of the team. Be sure to stress how their absence affected the business as a whole.

As a consequence of that first no call, no show, you might also consider applying a penalty of some kind. You could reduce the employee’s pay for the next shift worked, or reduce their seniority. It’s also important to warn the employee that the next offense will result in termination (if that’s your policy). If the employee fails to show up for work again without telling anyone, let that employee go.

4. Address The Core Of The Problem By Improving Your Scheduling Process

If you still have a problem after setting up your no call, no show policy, making sure everyone understands it, and enforcing the policy consistently, it’s time to improve your employee scheduling process. Even if your business hasn’t encountered a no call, no show problem yet, you can prevent one from developing by examining the way you schedule employees.

Look closely at your scheduling process and ask yourself the following questions:

If the answer to any of these questions is no, your employees may see it as an unnecessary hassle and just decide that skipping work is easier.

We’ve developed Sling to solve these problems. Sling puts all your scheduling activity in the cloud, which means that you and your team can access it anytime, anywhere. Employees can request time off, indicate availability, and even find their own substitute, all online with one, easy-to-use application. This greatly simplifies the scheduling process for you and your employees. And when a process like requesting time off or changing availability is simple, employees will be more likely to adhere to it even if emergencies arise.

5. Establish An On-Call List

Now that you’ve got a policy and process in place, you can work to reduce no call, no shows while dealing with these problems effectively. But what are your other employees to do when an employee doesn’t show up? Try to work shorthanded? That can be a recipe for disaster. Thankfully, preventing this disaster is simple.

Instead of allowing everyone else to suffer because of this one employee, we suggest you establish an on-call list that you can turn to should someone fail to show up. This on-call list should be made up of regular employees who are willing to fill in on short notice should the need arise. Some employees almost always want more hours, but if you’re having problems getting people to volunteer to be on that list, you might consider offering a twenty-five-cent raise for all emergency hours worked. Even a small bump in pay can motivate an employee to drop whatever they were doing and come in to cover for a no call, no show employee.

6. Get To Know Your Employees

Getting to know your employees is a great way to prevent no call, no show incidents from happening. These types of absences are often the result of a build up of factors both at home and at work. Perhaps the employee is having problems with a family member and is feeling stressed. Perhaps the employee has a problem with a certain person at work and is feeling disengaged. You won’t know unless you talk to your employees. Once you do know, though, you can take steps to help them and avoid no call, no show absences.

If they’re having problems at home, maybe the employee needs to go from full-time to part-time in order to take care of the issue. By giving the employee with the problem a chance to take care of things on his end, you avoid the possibility that the stress will build up and he just won’t show up one day.

If an employee is having problems at work, you need to know about it. Issues left to fester can pile up and make the employee feel unappreciated or even persecuted. That can lead them to feel that a no call, no show absence is justified to get your attention. Head these issues off at the pass by getting to know your employees and reassuring them that they can come to you with any problems.

Get The Right Tools To Help

Your business’ success is directly dependent on how you manage your employees. One bad apple can spoil the whole bunch. Don’t let a no call, no show employee affect the team or your business. Put a policy in place that establishes rules for absences and then make plans to cover employees that don’t show up for work. That way, all your bases will be covered and you won’t be left short-staffed during an extremely busy shift. To streamline your scheduling process and combat no call, no show absences, check out our free employee scheduling platform at GetSling.com right now.